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Tuesday, March 6, 2012

CALCASIEU GREYS -- MARCH 2012

NEXT MEETING
The next meeting of Captain James W. Bryan Camp 1390 will be from 6-8 p.m., Monday, March 12 at Pitt Grill in Sulphur. Camp Commander Archie Toombs will highlight all the great activities we have coming up, including our information table at  the Gun Show in Lake Charles on March 17, 18; the Niblett's Bluff Spring Festival the second weekend in April, Confederate History Month, the Pleasant Hill Reenactment the third weekend, and  the dedication of a grave marker for Compatriot Al Cochran's ancestor April 28 at the Bivens Cemetery.





Daily Iberian reporter Patrick Flanagan, left, interviews
Compatriot Mike Jones about his presentation on the
Tiger Rifles at the Young-Sanders Center on Feb. 25.
(Photo by Susan Jones)

THE TIGER RIFLES STORY TOLD
                FRANKLIN, La. -- The Tiger Rifles were the "toughest" fighting men in the War for Southern Independence, according to Michael Dan Jones, the author of The Tiger Rifles: The Making of a Louisiana Legend.
                Jones was the guest speaker at the Young-Sanders Center for the Study of the War Between the States in Louisiana, Saturday, Feb. 25.
Jones said he highlights the South's "Cause" in the book. He noted that they were fighting for Southern Independence because they  really  believed in the  Doctrine of States Rights, as espoused by Thomas Jefferson and further developed by John C. Calhoun and Jefferson Davis.
              The author also highlighted the leaders and men of the unit. He said Major Chatham Roberdeau Wheat was the commander of their battalion, the 1st Special Battalion (Wheat's) Louisiana Volunteers. The commander of the company, Company B (Tiger Rifles), was a man with a rather shady past, Captain Alexander White, but who was also a charismatic leader of men.
                With regards to the enlisted men, he said their unique "Zouave" uniforms  set them apart from other Confederates, as well as their fierce fighting abilities. He said most of the men were Irish immigrants working on the docks of New Orleans, and the steamboats of the Mississippi River. Others were from Germany, many northern states, southern states and at least two possible "free men of color." He said there were also four women soldiers in the Tiger Rifles, called "vivandieres," who wore a feminine versions of the Zouave uniform, and provided first aid for the soldiers in battle.
              Jones also highlighted the Tiger Rifles heroics in the battles they were in, the First Battle of Manassas, Front Royal, Middletown, Winchester, Port Republic, Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill. He said in most of those battles they played key  roles in bringing about Confederate victories. The book is available on http://www.amazon.com or from the author.

Pvt. Robert Patterson of the 12th Tennessee Infantry
which took part in the battle. (Library of Congress)


CO-HOSTS  SHILOH 150
     The National Sons of Confederate Veterans is co-hosting the 150th anniversary reenactment of the Battle of Shiloh March 29-April 1 near the actual battlefield. The event is being sponsored  by the Blue-Gray Alliance.
            The event is being held adjacent to  the Shiloh National Military Park off Hwy. 22 and Pratt Road, Shiloh Tenn.
            At 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 1, those attending will see a 30-minute artillery barrage like the one fired by Gen. Daniel Ruggles in the battle to break then Union position called the "Hornet's Nest". The reenactment will focus on the Confederate assault on the Hornet's Nest and the death of General Albert Sidney Johnston.
          Battles will be planned according to the historical records to keep them as accurate as possible.
            Admission to the event is $15 for those 13 years old and older. More information is available on the web site, http://shiloh150.org.
            The Battle of Shiloh was fought on April 6 and 7, 1862.  Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard led the Confederates. Generals Ulysses S. Grant and Don Carlos Buell led the Federals. The Confederates won the first day but reinforcements from Buell gained victory for the North on the  second day. Both sides suffered 23,746 casualties over the two days, the most of any battle up to that time.

GRAVE MARKER DEDICATION
     Compatriot Al Cochran is inviting all compatriots to the  Confederate Grave Marker dedication ceremony honoring his ancestor, William Alfred Cochran on Saturday, April 28 at 11:00 am at the Bivens Cemetery in Bivens, La. (outside of Merryville).
     Our new Camp Color Guard will be taking part in the ceremony. April is Confederate History Month and this is an excellent event to celebrate the month.

LOUISIANA DIVISION REUNION 2012
                The Louisiana Division SCV Reunion 2012 will be held May 11 and 12 at the Holiday Inn West,  5555 Financial Plaza, Shreveport. Registration is $15.
               
PLEASANT HILL REENACTMENT 2012 SCHEDULE
      The annual Battle of Pleasant  Hill reenactment will  be held Saturday and Sunday,  April 14-15, on the actual battlefield, about 3 miles north of the present town of Pleasant Hill.
      Here is the schedule for the event:
Festival / Parade / Re-enactment

April 14th, 2012 (Saturday)
Event: Breakfast
Time: 6:00 - 10:00 AM
Place: American Legion Hall
Event: Parade
Time: 10:00 AM
Place: Downtown Pleasant Hill
For more information contact Erin Stockton if you would like to be in the parade 601-297-2178 or email ewhstockton@yahoo.com
Parade Application
Event: Open Camp Activities
Time: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Event: Battle Re-enactment at Pleasant Hill
Opening Ceremonies: 1:30 PM
Time: 2:00 PM
Event: Confederate Ball and Court Presentation
Time: 7:30 PM
Place: American Legion Hall
Must be in period dress to participate. Those not in period dress may observe.

April 15th, 2012 (Sunday)
Event: Breakfast
Time: 6:00 - 10:00 AM
Place: American Legion Hall
Event: Open Camp Activities
Time: 10:00 AM to Noon
Event: Church Services (open to all)
Time: 10:00 AM
Event: Mail Call
Time: After Church
Event: Battle Re-enactment at Pleasant Hill
Time: 2:00 PM

Pleasant Hill re-enactments and activities in the re-enactors camp will take place 3 miles north of Pleasant Hill at 23271 Hwy. 175, Pelican, LA.




Pvt. William Askew of the 1st Georgia Infantry.
A determined Confederate. (Library of  Congress)
The Richmond Daily Dispatch
12 February 1862

THE SPIRIT OF THE SOUTH
                We predict that the recent disasters which our arms have suffered will have more effect in stimulating the volunteer spirit than could be accomplished by any other cause. It was in the darken bear of our fortunes that we saw the greatest rush of our population to arms, and if their zeal has since diminished, it was in consequence of that succession of brilliant victories which led them to despise the enemy and believe that all danger had past. We are now paying the penalty of this blunder, but we feel sure-paradoxical as it may appear, that our cause is safer in the moment of evident danger than in that of apparent security. If we do not altogether mistake the character of the Southern people, the most intense eagerness will now be manifested by every human being in the Southern Confederacy to retrieve our fortunes, and to have vengeance upon this insolent and bloody ice.
                The people of the South have only one thing to ask, and that is that their patriotism and courage shall be as intelligently and prudently directed as they are cheerfully and disinterestedly offered. They are determined never to be subjugated by the Yankees.-- "never, never, never." If they take our cities, that is no more than the British did in 1776, and even in 1812, when they captured the capital of the Republic. In the Revolution, Richmond itself was taken by the Yankee traitor in British pay, Benedict Arnold; New York was not only taken, but held six years, and never given up till peace; whole States were overrun and occupied by the enemy. But the spirit of the people could not be conquered, and, unless the South has degenerated, it cannot be conquered now. If she held out then for seven years, against the British Lion, ought she not to hold out seventy against a nation which has so far fallen from its first estate that the faintest roar of the Lion has thrown it into convulsions? But there must be no more apathy — no more false security; every man must act as if upon him alone depended the destinies of the Republic. The North is about to make its last and greatest effort. Let us summon all our energies, and by all that is glorious in our past, and that is worth living for in the future — by the graves of our dead, and the homes of our living, let us have victory and vengeance.

CWT & PAMPLIN PARK OPEN NEW WALKING TRAIL

                Petersburg, VA – The Civil War Trust  and Pamplin Historical Park (PHP) have partnered to create a new walking trail to the Jones Farm battlefield of March 25, 1865.  This new .8 mile-path connects Pamplin Historical Park’s existing Headwaters Trail with a pristine section of surviving earthworks captured on March 25, 1865 in the Battle of Jones Farm. This important but little-known engagement influenced the Sixth Corps assaults a week later at the Breakthrough battle of April 2, 1865. The Trust and PHP will dedicate the new Jones Farm Loop Trail on March 31, 2012 at the Park’s annual anniversary event commemorating the Petersburg Breakthrough battle.
                The day’s activities begin with a pre-dawn tour from 5:00 – 7:00 a.m. beginning at the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier.  This hike across the hallowed ground will include the new Jones Farm Loop Trail and participants may wish to bring a flashlight as they walk the same ground under the same conditions as the soldiers of 147 years ago.  A complimentary hot breakfast will be served to all registered participants in the Banquet Room at the conclusion of the walk. The cost for the tour, breakfast, daily park admission, and all special programs is $12, with Park Members admitted at no cost. Contact Member Services by Wednesday, March 28 to reserve a space on this tour. Reservations are required and are non-refundable. Call (804) 861-2408 or email MemberServices@pamplinpark.org. 
                The Park will open for other visitors at 8:00 a.m. to accommodate a full schedule of events. Park admission is $12 for adults and $7 for children ages 6-12. Children under six are admitted free. Activities during the day-long event include tours of the Battle of Jones Farm and Breakthrough battlefields, Civil War Trust staff remarks, a trail opening ceremony, and military and civilian living history programs. Dr. Timothy Sedore will talk about his book Virginia's Confederate Monuments and hold a book signing. For a detailed flyer including a schedule of events, visit http://pamplinpark.org/pdfs/BreakthroughFlyer.pdf.                        One of “Virginia’s Best Places to Visit” according to the Travel Channel, and designated as a National Historic Landmark, Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier is a 422-acre Civil War campus located in Dinwiddie County, Virginia offering a combination of high-tech museums and hands-on experiences.  The Park has four world-class museums and four antebellum homes. The Park is also the site of the Breakthrough battlefield of April 2, 1865 and America’s premiere participatory experience, Civil War Adventure Camp. For more information, please call 804-861-2408 or visit www.pamplinpark.org.
                The Civil War Trust is the largest nonprofit battlefield preservation organization in the United States.  Its goal is to preserve our nation’s endangered Civil War sites and to promote appreciation of these hallowed grounds through education and heritage tourism.  To date, the Trust has preserved more than 30,000 acres of battlefield land in 20 states.  Please visit the Trust’s website at www.civilwar.org, the home of the Civil War sesquicentennial.

CWT & PAMPLIN PARK OPEN NEW WALKING TRAIL

                Petersburg, VA – The Civil War Trust  and Pamplin Historical Park (PHP) have partnered to create a new walking trail to the Jones Farm battlefield of March 25, 1865.  This new .8 mile-path connects Pamplin Historical Park’s existing Headwaters Trail with a pristine section of surviving earthworks captured on March 25, 1865 in the Battle of Jones Farm. This important but little-known engagement influenced the Sixth Corps assaults a week later at the Breakthrough battle of April 2, 1865. The Trust and PHP will dedicate the new Jones Farm Loop Trail on March 31, 2012 at the Park’s annual anniversary event commemorating the Petersburg Breakthrough battle.
                The day’s activities begin with a pre-dawn tour from 5:00 – 7:00 a.m. beginning at the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier.  This hike across the hallowed ground will include the new Jones Farm Loop Trail and participants may wish to bring a flashlight as they walk the same ground under the same conditions as the soldiers of 147 years ago.  A complimentary hot breakfast will be served to all registered participants in the Banquet Room at the conclusion of the walk. The cost for the tour, breakfast, daily park admission, and all special programs is $12, with Park Members admitted at no cost. Contact Member Services by Wednesday, March 28 to reserve a space on this tour. Reservations are required and are non-refundable. Call (804) 861-2408 or email MemberServices@pamplinpark.org. 
                The Park will open for other visitors at 8:00 a.m. to accommodate a full schedule of events. Park admission is $12 for adults and $7 for children ages 6-12. Children under six are admitted free. Activities during the day-long event include tours of the Battle of Jones Farm and Breakthrough battlefields, Civil War Trust staff remarks, a trail opening ceremony, and military and civilian living history programs. Dr. Timothy Sedore will talk about his book Virginia's Confederate Monuments and hold a book signing. For a detailed flyer including a schedule of events, visit http://pamplinpark.org/pdfs/BreakthroughFlyer.pdf.                        One of “Virginia’s Best Places to Visit” according to the Travel Channel, and designated as a National Historic Landmark, Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier is a 422-acre Civil War campus located in Dinwiddie County, Virginia offering a combination of high-tech museums and hands-on experiences.  The Park has four world-class museums and four antebellum homes. The Park is also the site of the Breakthrough battlefield of April 2, 1865 and America’s premiere participatory experience, Civil War Adventure Camp. For more information, please call 804-861-2408 or visit www.pamplinpark.org.
                The Civil War Trust is the largest nonprofit battlefield preservation organization in the United States.  Its goal is to preserve our nation’s endangered Civil War sites and to promote appreciation of these hallowed grounds through education and heritage tourism.  To date, the Trust has preserved more than 30,000 acres of battlefield land in 20 states.  Please visit the Trust’s website at www.civilwar.org, the home of the Civil War sesquicentennial.
Pvt. John White, Virginia drummer boy.
(Library of Congress)
WAR FOR SOUTHERN INDEPENDENCE FIRSTS

First time troops were transported by railroad to a battle: First Battle of Manassas, Virginia, 21 July 1861.

First major battle in which black troops fought: Port Hudson, Louisiana, May 27, 1863.

First Union victory of the war: Fort Donelson, 13 February 1862.

First person to received the U.S. Medal of Honor twice: Lt. Thomas Custer, (The brother of Gen. George Armstrong Custer)

First gun fired to defend the Union: 8 January 1861, Pensacola, Florida.

First Confederate general to ask for surrender terms: Simon Boliver Buckner 15 February 1862.

First Confederate money: Printed in New York City before the firing on Fort Sumter, South Carolina.

First shot fired at Fort Sumter: Lt. Henry S. Farley at 4:30 a.m. April 12, 1861 from James Island.

First submarine to sink an enemy  warship: C.S.S. Hunley, 17 February 1864, sank the U.S.S. Housatonic.

First Union soldier to die (by accident): Private Daniel Hough, Fort Sumter, when the garrison fired a salute in the surrender ceremony.

First Confederate killed in action in the war: Captain John Q. Marr,  17th Virginia Infantry, June 1, 1861, Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia.

First Louisiana Confederate officer killed in action: Lt. Col. Charles Dreaux, 1st Louisiana Infantry Battalion, 5 July 1861, near Newport News, Va.

 

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